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May 13, 2004, 9:00 AM ET, Alert No. 897.
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Capital Markets Subcommittee Approves Stock Options Bill

5/12. The House Financial Services Committee's Subcommittee on Capital Markets amended and approved HR 3574, the "Stock Options Accounting Reform Act".

Rep. Richard BakerThe Subcommittee approved an amendment in the nature of a substitute offered by Rep. Richard Baker (R-LA) (at right), the Chairman of the Subcommittee, and lead sponsor of the bill.

On March 31, 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) released a document titled "Exposure Draft, Share-Based Payment, an Amendment of FASB Statements No. 123 and 95" that proposes that companies must expense stock option plans for all employees.

The FASB stated that "The exposure draft covers a wide range of equity-based compensation arrangements. Under the Board's proposal, all forms of share-based payments to employees, including employee stock options, would be treated the same as other forms of compensation by recognizing the related cost in the income statement. The expense of the award would generally be measured at fair value at the grant date. Current accounting guidance requires that the expense relating to so-called fixed plan employee stock options only be disclosed in the footnotes to the financial statements."

The FASB's comment period for the exposure draft ends June 30, 2004. See, story titled "FASB Proposes Expensing of Stock Options" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 867, April 1, 2004.

The FASB exposure draft has been condemned by technology companies and the trade groups that represent them, which argue that broad based employee stock option plans incent innovation, and enable new start up companies to compete.

Rep. Baker stated that this bill "would simply require the expensing of stock options for the top five employees of each corporation".

The bill defines the top five employees as "all individuals serving as the chief executive officer", and "the 4 most highly compensated executive officers". It would require the issuer of stock to "show as an expense .. the fair value of all options to purchase the stock of the issuer".

FASB Independence. Rep. Paul Kanjorsky (D-PA), the ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee, spoke in opposition to the bill. He argued that HR 3574 constitutes political interference with the accounting standards setting process. He stated that "To strengthen investor confidence and promote international convergence of corporate reporting standards, FASB must proceed with diligence, and without political interference".

He offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute. It stated in its enumeration of purposes that "Investors benefit from independent and fair accounting standards that are free from undue political interference" and that "The rulemaking authority and credibility of the accounting standard-setting process may be irreparably damaged by legislation that preempts the existing public, fair, and deliberative process."

This amendment would have removed the Congress from the accounting standards setting process.

Rep. Darlene Hooley (D-OR) responded to the argument that the Congress should not engage in political interference. She said that this is what the Congress does.

Rep. Baker attacked the political process followed by the FASB in this matter. He said that the FASB announced its conclusion before its received public comments, that it refused to conduct field tests, that it refused to consider proposals, and that it otherwise failed to conduct in standards setting process in an open and professional manner. He said that the "FASB has not met their own standard".

This amendment failed on a voice vote.

Expensing of Stock Options Over $100,000. Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA), who was the most vocal opponent of the bill at this markup, offered numerous amendments. One amendment would have allowed companies not to expense employee stock options, but only for the first $100,000 per year for each employee. It would have required the expensing of any stock option amount over $100,000.

This amendment failed on a voice vote.

Capitalization of Research Projects. Rep. Sherman also offered an amendment that stated, "The amendments made by this Act shall cease to be effective 60 days after a recognized standard setting body shall establish a principle, or the Commission shall promulgate a rule, providing for capitalization of research projects."

He argued in support of his amendment that the failure to allow capitalization of research projects "treats high tech unfairly", and that "expensing research discourages research".

Rep. Spencer Bachus (R-AL) argued against this amendment. He said that "there is no guarantee that research and development will be successful". Hence, "in most cases there is no asset created from research and development". Yet, he argued, the amendment would treat this situation as though there were an asset.

This amendment failed on a voice vote.

Zero Volatility Assumption. Rep. Sherman also offered an amendment to the bill's provisions regarding the valuation of those stock options of the top five employees. The bill basically follows the FASB method, but then assumes zero volatility. This Sherman amendment would have removed the language regarding zero volatility. Rep. Sherman stated that zero volatility "is a phony system".

Rep. Pat Toomey (R-PA) and Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA) argued against the amendment. Rep. Royce argued that if you remove the zero volatility assumption then you will penalize companies with volatile stock prices. And this, said Rep. Royce, includes technology companies in California. He also argued that removing the zero volatility assumption would affect these companies ability to attract top talent.

This amendment failed on a voice vote.

Increased Stock Option Reporting Disclosures. Rep. Bob Ney (R-OH), who supports the bill, offered an amendment that would have required more detailed reporting to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regarding stock option plans, including a discussion of the dilutive effect of stock option plans on earnings, "the number of outstanding stock options", "the weighted average exercise price of all outstanding stock options", and "the estimated number of stock options outstanding that will vest in each year".

He explained that, in order to incent innovation, and to enable small companies to compete with incumbents, there should be no requirement that stock options be expensed. But, investors, such as pension plans in his state of Ohio, need more information about stock option plans.

Rep. Ney withdrew his amendment after Rep. Baker promised to work with him before the full committee markup on language that would accomplish this purpose.

The Subcommittee approved one technical amendment offered by Rep. Sherman, with little discussion.

There were no roll call votes. Rep. Baker spoke with reporters after the markup. He stated that "we had done fairly significant pre-mark up whipping." He added that had there been a roll call vote "the outcome would have very decisive" and "bipartisan".

He suggested that full committee markup could come in June. Moreover, he wants "floor consideration before August".

The Senate has not yet passed related legislation.

House Judiciary Committee Holds Mark Up Session

5/12. The House Judiciary Committee held a meeting to mark up numerous bills. Several are technology related.

The Committee amended and approved HR 3754, the "Fraudulent Online Identity Sanctions Act", with little discussion, by voice vote. See, following story titled "House Judiciary Committee Approves Domain Name Fraud Bill"

The Committee amended and approved S 1301, the "Video Voyeurism Prevention Act". The full Senate has already passed this bill.

The Committee also amended and approved HR 1731, the "Identity Theft Penalty Enhancement Act". This bill pertains to penalties for "aggravated identity theft", including identity theft that is associated with terrorism crimes and certain enumerated felonies.

The Committee held over HR 3632, the "Anticounterfeiting Amendments of 2003". This bill would revise and expand 18 U.S.C. 2318, which pertains to trafficking in counterfeit labels, documentation and packaging of computer programs, phonorecords, and movies. See, story titled "Rep. Smith Introduces Bill to Strengthen Ban on Counterfeit Labeling of Software, Movies and Music" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 787, November 26, 2003.

Finally, the Committee held over HR 338, the "Federal Agency Protection of Privacy Act". This bill would amend Title 5 to require that when federal agencies promulgate rules, that they take into consideration the impact of such rules on the privacy of individuals. The Committee and the full House passed a similar bill in the 107th Congress.

Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-WI), the Chairman of the Committee, did not state when the Committee would continue its mark up. However, Wednesday, May 19, at 10:00 AM would be a likely time.

House Judiciary Committee Approves Domain Name Fraud Bill

5/12. The House Judiciary Committee amended and approved HR 3754, the "Fraudulent Online Identity Sanctions Act", with little discussion, by voice vote. The Committee deleted from the bill two clauses that provided limited immunity from liability for domain name registrars.

Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX) and Rep. Howard Berman (D-CA), the Chairman and ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee on Courts, the Internet and Intellectual Property (CIIP), introduced this bill on February 3, 2004. The CIIP Subcommittee amended and approved this bill on March 31, 2004.

The bill addresses the registration of domain names with false information. Law enforcement authorities use the Whois database to identify and locate people who use web sites to commit crimes. False registration information makes identifying the fraud artists more difficult. False registration information also makes it harder for trademark holders to pursue cybersquatters, for copyrights holders to locate online infringers, and for manufacturers to locate online sellers of counterfeit goods.

The bill adds new civil remedies and criminal penalties for violation of existing statutes, where the violation also involves registering a domain name with false information. For example, it amends the Copyright Act to provide that, for the purpose of calculating statutory damages for infringement, the infringement shall be considered willful if the infringement also involves registering a domain name with false information.

The provides provides, "In a case of infringement, it shall be a rebuttable presumption that the infringement was commited willfully for purposes of determining relief if the violator, or a person acting in concert with the violator, knowingly provided or knowingly caused to be provided materially false contact information to a domain name registrar, domain name registry, or other domain name registration authority in registering, maintaining, or renewing a domain name used in connection with the infringement."

The bill as introduced creates no new civil or criminal prohibition of registering a domain name with false information. Nor does it impose any requirements upon domain name registrars to verify domain name registration information, to refuse to register domain names when it knows that the registration information is false, or to cancel registrations made with false registration information.

The Committee approved an amendment offered by Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX) that removes two provisions of the bill providing immunity to registrars. For example, in the copyright section, the amendment removed the following language: "Nothing in this paragraph shall impose any new liability on a domain name registrar unless the domain name registrar knowingly provides materially false contact information to a domain name registry or other domain name registration authority."

Rep. Berman stated that domain name registrars had determined that they would prefer that the immunity language not be included in the bill; while it created immunity from certain liability, it also might have created new liability.

Ken Wasch, President of the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA), stated in a release after the markup that "With its action today to restore accuracy and reliability to the Whois database of registration data for domain names, the Judiciary Committee has taken an important step to uphold consumer protection; enforce intellectual property rights; assist law enforcement investigations of online crimes; and promote network security."

See, story titled "Representatives Introduce Bill to Deter Domain Name Fraud" and "House Subcommittee Holds Hearing on False Domain Name Registration Data" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 830, February 5, 2004, and story titled "Groups Oppose Fraudulent Online Identity Sanctions Act" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 891, May 5, 2004.

More Capitol Hill News

5/12. The House Government Reform Committee's Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations and the Census postponed its hearing titled "The Science of Voting Machine Technology: Accuracy, Reliability, and Security".

5/12. The Senate Commerce Committee held a hearing titled "Telecommunications Policy Review: A View from Industry". See, opening statement of Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), the Chairman of the Committee. See also, prepared testimony of witnesses: Ivan Seidenberg (Ch/CEO of Verizon), Brian Roberts (P/CEO of Comcast), Scott Ford (P/CEO of ALLTEL), Garry Betty (P/CEO of Earthlink), and Delbert Wilson (former CEO of the Central Texas Telephone Cooperative).

5/12. The Senate Judiciary Committee held a hearing on S 2013, the "Satellite Home Viewer Extension Act of 2004", a bill to amend 17 U.S.C. 119. See, opening statement of Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-UT), the Chairman of the Committee, opening statement of Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), the ranking Democrat on the Committee, and opening statement of Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI). See also, prepared testimony of witnesses: David Carson (Copyright Office), Charles Ergen (EchoStar), Bruce Reese (Bonneville International Corporation), Eddy Hartenstein (DirecTV), Fritz Attaway (Motion Picture Association of America), and John King (Vermont Public Television).

Bill Would Reinstate Video Description Rules

5/6. Rep. Ed Markey (D-MA) introduced HR 4311, the "Video Description Restoration Act of 2004", a bill to reinstate the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) rules for the description of video programming.

On November 8, 2002, the U.S. Court of Appeals (DCCir) issued its opinion in MPAA v. FCC, vacating the FCC's video description rules. See, story titled "DC Circuit Vacates FCC's Video Description Rules" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 547, November 12, 2002.

47 U.S.C. 613(g) defines video description as "the insertion of audio narrated descriptions of a television program's key visual elements into natural pauses between the program's dialogue".

47 U.S.C. 613(f) provides that "Within 6 months after February 8, 1996, the Commission shall commence an inquiry to examine the use of video descriptions on video programming in order to ensure the accessibility of video programming to persons with visual impairments, and report to Congress on its findings."

However, the FCC adopted a Report and Order [MS Word] in the proceeding titled "Implementation of Video Description of Video Programming" (MM Docket No. 99-339) in which it concluded that "we have the authority to adopt video description rules, and require the top broadcast stations and multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to provide programming with video description on the top programming networks."

The Appeals Court held that the FCC does not have authority under the statute to require video description rules, and vacated the order. Rep. Markey's bill would overturn this court opinion, and reinstate the order.

The bill was referred to the House Commerce Committee. Rep. Markey is the ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet.

This case is Motion Picture Association of America, Inc., et al., v. FCC and USA, respondents, and National Television Video Access Coalition, intervenors, App. Ct. Nos. 01-1149 and 01-1155, petitions for review of a final order of the FCC. It is also reported at 309 F. 3d 796.

Washington Tech Calendar
New items are highlighted in red.
Thursday, May 13

The House will meet at 10:00 AM for legislative business. The agenda includes consideration of several non-technology related bills. See, Republican Whip notice.

The Senate will meet at 9:30 AM. It will resume consideration of S 1248, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) reauthorization bill.

8:45 AM - 1:45 PM. The AEI-Brookings Joint Center will host an event titled "Regulating Wireless: How Much and By Whom?" At 9:10 AM there will be a panel discussion titled "Should the States Regulate Wireless Services?". The Speakers will be Anne Boyle (Nebraska Public Service Commission), Boyden Gray (Wilmer Cutler & Pickering), and Peter Passell (Milken Institute). At 10:40 AM there will be a panel discussion titled "How Should the FCC Resolve Competing Claims to Spectrum?" The speakers will be Gerald Faulhaber (University of Pennsylvania), Tom Hazlett (Manhattan Institute), Bryan Tramont (FCC), and Scott Walsten (AEI-Brookings). At 12:15 PM FCC Commissioner Kathleen Abernathy will give a luncheon address. See, notice and registration page. Location: AEI, 12th Floor, 1150 17th Street, NW.

9:30 AM. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will hold a meeting. See, agenda [PDF]. The event will be webcast. Location: FCC, 445 12th Street, SW, Room TW-C05 (Commission Meeting Room).

9:30 AM - 12:00 NOON. The Department of State's International Telecommunication Advisory Committee (ITAC) will meet to prepare for CITEL Steering Group Meetings. See, notice in the Federal Register, May 7, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 89, at Page 25654. Location: undisclosed.

POSTPONED. 10:00 AM. The House Commerce Committee will meet to mark up the "Satellite Home Viewer Extension and Reauthorization Act". Press contact: Larry Neal or Jon Tripp at 202 225-5735. See, notice. Location: Room 2123, Rayburn Building.

10:00 AM. The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold an executive business meeting. The agenda includes consideration of S 1933, the "Enhancing Federal Obscemity Reporting and Copyright Enforcement (ENFORCE) Act of 2003", S 1635, the "L-1 Visa (Intracompany Transferee) Reform Act of 2003", and S 2013, the "Satellite Home Viewer Extension Act of 2004". See, notice. Press contact: Margarita Tapia (Hatch) at 202 224-5225 or David Carle (Leahy) at 202 224-4242. Location: Room 226, Dirksen Building.

10:00 AM. The House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on the Constitution will meet to mark up several items, including HRes 568, a resolution that states that U.S. courts should not use foreign opinions to interpret U.S. law. The meeting will be webcast. Press contact: Jeff Lungren or Terry Shawn at 202 225-2492. Location: Room 2141 Rayburn Building.

TIME CHANGE. 10:30 AM - 12:00 NOON. The American Enterprise Institute (AEI) will host an event titled "Competition Laws in Conflict: Antitrust Jurisdiction in the Global Economy". The speakers will be Timothy Muris (Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission), Richard Epstein (University of Chicago), and Michael Greve (AEI). See, notice and registration page. Location: AEI, 12th floor, 1150 17th St., NW.

10:30 AM - 12:30 PM. The House Science Committee will hold a hearing on HR 4218, the "High-Performance Computing Revitalization Act of 2004". The hearing will be webcast by the Committee. Location: Room 2318, Rayburn Building.

12:00 NOON - 2:00 PM. The DC Bar Association's Corporation Law Section and Emerging Business Committee will host a brown bag lunch. The topic will be "Technology Contracts -- How To Make Sure The Contract Reflects The Deal". The speakers will be Behnam Dayanim and Mark Poerio of the law firm of Paul Hastings. Prices vary. See, notice. Location: D.C. Bar Conference Center, B-1 Level, 1250 H Street, NW.

12:00 NOON. The Heritage Foundation will host a panel discussion titled "Broadband by 2007: A Look at the President's Internet Initiative". The speakers will be John Kneuer (National Telecommunications and Information Administration), Harold Furchtgott-Roth (former FCC Commissioner), David McIntosh (law firm of Mayer Brown Rowe & Maw), Peter Pitsch (Director of Communications Policy at Intel), James Gattuso (Heritage). Refreshments will be served. See, notice. RSVP to 202 675-1761. Location: Heritage, 214 Massachusetts Ave., NE.

12:00 NOON. The Congressional Internet Caucus Advisory Committee will host a panel discussion titled "Wi-Fi Versus Sci-Fi: Realities, Barriers, Boundaries". The speakers will be John Hoadley (Nortel Networks), Joshua Baylin (Legg Mason), and J.H. Snider (New America Foundation). Lunch will be served. RSVP to rsvp@netcaucus.org or 202 638-4370. Location: Room HC-5, Capitol Building.

12:15 - 1:30 PM. The DC Bar Association's International Law Section and the Federal Communications Bar Association's (FCBA) International Telecommunications Committee will host a brown bag lunch titled "International Trade Issues In Telecommunications Services". The speakers will be Jonathan McHale (Office of the U.S. Trade Representative), Kenneth Schagrin (Office of the USTR), Claire Blue (International Bureau, Federal Communications Commission), Laura Sherman, Troy Tanner (Swidler Berlin), and Lisa Choi (FCC International Bureau). Prices vary. See, notice. For more information, contact 202 626-3488. Location: D.C. Bar Conference Center, B-1 Level, 1250 H Street, NW.

2:00 PM. The House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Commercial and Administrative Law will hold a hearing on HR 3220, the "Business Activity Tax Simplification Act of 2003", sponsored by Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), Rep. Rick Boucher (D-VA), and others. See, story titled "Reps. Goodlatte and Boucher Introduce Bill to Limit Business Activity Taxes" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 753, October 6, 2003. The hearing will be webcast by the Committee. Press contact: Jeff Lungren or Terry Shawn at 202 225-2492. Location: Room 2141, Rayburn Building.

Friday, May 14

9:00 - 10:30 AM. The Progressive Policy Institute (PPI) will host a lecture by Michael Mandel of Business Week magazine, regarding how technology advances drive economic growth. Mandel will discuss his new book, titled "Rational Exuberance: Silencing the Enemies of Growth and Why the Future is Better Than You Think". Robert Atkinson, Director of the PPI's Technology and New Economy Project, will moderate. Breakfast will be served. RSVP to 202 547-0001 or PPIEvents@dlcppi.org. Location: PPI, 600 Pennsylvania Ave., SE, Suite 400.

Day one of a three day conference hosted by American University titled "Critical Infrastructure Information" See, notice. American University, Ward Circle, intersection of Massachusetts and Nebraska Avenues, NW.

Saturday, May 15

Day two of a three day conference hosted by American University titled "Critical Infrastructure Information". See, notice. American University, Ward Circle, intersection of Massachusetts and Nebraska Avenues, NW.

Extended deadline to submit applications to the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Privacy Office to be considered for membership on the Data Integrity, Privacy, and Interoperability Advisory Committee. See, notice in the Federal Register, May 3, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 85, at Page 24178.

Sunday, May 16

Day two of a three day conference hosted by American University titled "Critical Infrastructure Information". See, notice. American University, Ward Circle, intersection of Massachusetts and Nebraska Avenues, NW.

Monday, May 17

The Supreme Court will return from the recess that it began on May 3.

9:30 AM. The U.S. Court Appeals (DCCir) will hear oral argument in PanAmSat v. FCC, No. 03-1133. Judges Edwards, Sentelle and Rogers will preside. Location: Prettyman Courthouse, 333 Constitution Ave.

12:15 PM. The Federal Communications Bar Association's (FCBA) Online Committee will host a brown bag lunch. The speaker will be Hillary Brill, legislative assistant to Rep. Rick Boucher (D-VA). RSVP to Evelyn Opany at 202 689-7163. Location: Piper Rudnick, 1200 19th Street, NW, Suite 700.

Day one of a three day conference of the American Cable Association. See, notice. Location: Wyndham Hotel.

Deadline to submit comments to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) regarding the complaint that the USTR submitted to the World Trade Organization (WTO) regarding the PR China's value added tax on integrated circuits. See, story titled "US Complains to WTO About PR China's Tax Preference for Domestic Producers of Integrated Circuits" in TLJ Daily E-Mail Alert No. 859, March 19, 2004. See also, notice in the Federal Register (April 21, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 77, at Pages 21593 - 21594) requesting comments.

Deadline to submit reply comments to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in response to its notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) regarding unwanted mobile service commercial messages and the CAN-SPAM Act. This is CG Docket No. 04-53. See, notice in the Federal Register, March 31, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 62, at Pages 16873 - 16886.

Tuesday, May 18

8:30 AM - 3:00 PM. George Mason University (GMU) will host a symposium titled "Information Technology for Homeland Security". See, agenda and registration pages. Location: GMU, Fairfax Campus, Dewberry Hall in the Johnson Center.

9:30 AM. The U.S. Court Appeals (DCCir) will hear oral argument in Vista Communications v. FCC, Nos. 01-1168 and 03-1281. Judges Edwards, Sentelle and Henderson will preside. Location: Prettyman Courthouse, 333 Constitution Ave.

9:30 AM. The North American Numbering Council (NANC) will meet. See, notice in Federal Register, April 12, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 70, at Pages 19183 - 19184. Location: Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 445 12th Street, SW, Room TW-C305.

12:00 NOON - 1:30 PM. The Federal Communications Bar Association's (FCBA) Common Carrier Practice Committee will host a brown bag lunch. The topic will be "Meet Wireline Competition Bureau Chief Bill Maher". The FCBA states that this will be an opportunity "to hear directly from the Bureau Chief about all the major issues facing the Bureau -- unbundled network element negotiations and the future of the Triennial Review, the VOIP proceedings, intercarrier compensation reform, universal service reform, and other matters". For more information, contact Matt Brill, Jonathan Banks, or David Sieradzki, Co-Chairs of the FCBA's Common Carrier Practice Committee. RSVP to Cecelia Burnett at 202 637-8312. Location: Hogan & Hartson, 555 13th St., NW, Lower Level.

1:30 - 3:00 PM. (or 2:00 - 4:00 PM?) The Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) World RadioCommunication 2007 (WRC-07) Advisory Committee's Informal Working Group on Terrestrial and Space Science Services will meet. See, FCC notice [PDF]. Location: FCC, 445 12th Street, SW, South Conference Room, 6th Floor, Room 6-B516.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Day one of a two day closed meeting of the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) to discuss "cyber-related vulnerabilities of the internet". See, notice in the Federal Register, April 16, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 74, at Pages 20635 - 20636. Location: undisclosed.

Day one of a two day conference hosted by the CompTel/Ascent titled "Advancing the Business of VOIP". See, notice. Location: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel.

Day two of a three day conference of the American Cable Association. See, notice. Location: Wyndham Hotel.

Wednesday, May 19

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Day two of a two day closed meeting of the President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) to discuss "cyber-related vulnerabilities of the internet". See, notice in the Federal Register, April 16, 2004, Vol. 69, No. 74, at Pages 20635 - 20636. Location: undisclosed.

9:30 AM - 5:00 PM. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will host an event titled "Wireless Broadband Forum". See, notice and agenda [PDF]. Location: FCC, Room TW-C305 (Commission Meeting Room), 445 12th Street, SW.

2:00 - 4:00 PM. Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) World RadioCommunication 2007 (WRC-07) Advisory Committee's Informal Working Group on IMT-2000 and 2.5 GHz Sharing Issues will meet. See, FCC notice [PDF]. For more information, contact Cecily Cohen at 202 887-5210. Location: FCC, 445 12th Street, SW, South Conference Room, 6th Floor, Room 6-B516.

Day two of a two day conference hosted by the CompTel/Ascent titled "Advancing the Business of VOIP". See, notice. Location: Renaissance Mayflower Hotel.

Day three of a three day conference of the American Cable Association. See, notice. Location: Wyndham Hotel.

More News

5/11. The U.S. Court of Appeals (DCCir) issued its opinion in American Family Association v. FCC, petitions for review of the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) order establishing its points system for allocating noncommercial educational (NCE) broadcast licenses among competing applicants. The Court denied the petitions. This case is American Family Association v. FCC and FCC, respondents, National Public Radio and Association of Public Television Stations, intervenors, U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, App. Ct. Nos. 00-1310, 00-1479, and 01-1222.

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